Details

Industrial Archaeology


Industrial Archaeology

Future Directions
Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology

von: Eleanor Casella, James Symonds

101,14 €

Verlag: Springer
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 04.01.2007
ISBN/EAN: 9780387228310
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 321

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Beschreibungen

Eleanor Conlin Casella and James Symonds th The essays in this book are adapted from papers presented at the 24 Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, held at the University of Manchester, in December 2002. The conference session “An Industrial Revolution? Future Directions for Industrial Arch- ology,” was jointly devised by the editors, and sponsored by English Heritage, with the intention of gathering together leading industrial and historical archaeologists from around the world. Speakers were asked to consider aspects of contemporary theory and practice, as well as possible future directions for the study of industrialisation and - dustrial societies. It perhaps ?tting that this meeting was convened in Manchester, which has a rich industrial heritage, and has recently been proclaimed as the “archetype” city of the industrial revolution (McNeil and George, 2002). However, just as Manchester is being transformed by reg- eration, shaking off many of the negative connotations associated st with factory-based industrial production, and remaking itself as a 21 century city, then so too, is the archaeological study of industrialisation being transformed. In the most recent overview of industrial archaeology in the UK, Sir Neil Cossons cautioned that industrial archaeology risked becoming a “one generation subject”, that stood on the edge of oblivion, alongside th the mid-20 century pursuit of folklife studies (Cossons 2000:13). It is to be hoped that the papers in this volume demonstrate that this will not be the case.
Eleanor Conlin Casella and James Symonds th The essays in this book are adapted from papers presented at the 24 Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, held at the University of Manchester, in December 2002. The conference session “An Industrial Revolution? Future Directions for Industrial Arch- ology,” was jointly devised by the editors, and sponsored by English Heritage, with the intention of gathering together leading industrial and historical archaeologists from around the world. Speakers were asked to consider aspects of contemporary theory and practice, as well as possible future directions for the study of industrialisation and - dustrial societies. It perhaps ?tting that this meeting was convened in Manchester, which has a rich industrial heritage, and has recently been proclaimed as the “archetype” city of the industrial revolution (McNeil and George, 2002). However, just as Manchester is being transformed by reg- eration, shaking off many of the negative connotations associated st with factory-based industrial production, and remaking itself as a 21 century city, then so too, is the archaeological study of industrialisation being transformed. In the most recent overview of industrial archaeology in the UK, Sir Neil Cossons cautioned that industrial archaeology risked becoming a “one generation subject”, that stood on the edge of oblivion, alongside th the mid-20 century pursuit of folklife studies (Cossons 2000:13). It is to be hoped that the papers in this volume demonstrate that this will not be the case.
-Preface, New Directions in Industrial Archaeology, Sir Neil Cossons, OBE., -Introduction, Eleanor Conlin Casella and James Symonds. -'Social Workers', Eleanor Conlin Casella -Experiencing Industry, James Symonds, -Industrial Archaeology, Marilyn Palmer -After Industrial Archaeology?, David Cranstone, -From Valves to Values, Kate Clark, -Publishing and Priority in Industrial Archaeology, David Gwyn, -Gas and Grain, David Worth, -Exploring Mrs. Gaskell's Legacy, Malcolm Cooper, -The Social Archaeology of Industrialisation, Mike Nevell, -Technological Innovation in the Early 19th Century Irish Cotton Industry, Colin Rynne, -Building A Working-Class Archaeology, Randall H. McGuire, -Cultural Identity and the Consumption of Industry, Stephen A. Mrozowski, -The Industrial Archaeology of Entertainment, Martin Hall -Colonisation in the Industrial Age, Susan Lawrence -Concluding Comments: Revolutionizing Industrial Archaeology?, Mary C. Beaudry
The essays in this book are adapted from papers presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, held at the University of Manchester, in December 2002. The conference session "An Industrial Revolution? Future Directions for Industrial Archaeology," was jointly devised by the editors, and sponsored by English Heritage, with the intention of gathering together leading industrial and historical archaeologists from around the world. However, just as Manchester is being transformed by regeneration, shaking off many of the negative connotations associated with factory-based industrial production, and remaking itself as a 21st century city, then so too, is the archaeological study of industrialisation being transformed.

Over the past decade, industrial archaeology has emerged as a theoretically driven subfield. Research has begun to meaningfully engage with such weighty issues as globalisation; post/modernity; power; innovation and invention; slavery and captivity; class, ethnic, and gender identities; social relations of technology and labour; and the spread and diversification of western capitalism.

With contributions from an international group of authors, this volume highlights the current thought in industrial archaeology, as well as explores future theoretical and methodological directions. Together, these chapters further the process of meaningful engagement with such weighty issues as globalization; post/modernity; power; production and consumption; innovation and invention; class, ethnic, and gender identities; social relations of technology and labour; and the spread and diversification of western capitalism.
Industrial Archaeology: Future Directions will be of interest to historical and urban archaeologists, architectural historians, preservation agencies, archaeological consulting organizations, cultural resource managers, and students of these disciplines.
Collected papers presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group

Brings together some of the foremost research and public archaeologists working on industrial archaeology

Highlights current thinking in industrial archaeology, and explores future theoretical and methodological directions

Will interest historical and urban archaeologists, historians, preservation agencies, archaeological consultancy groups
With an international group of authors, this volume highlights the current thought in industrial archaeology, as well as explores future theoretical and methodological directions. Industrial archaeology has emerged as a theoretically driven subfield. Research has begun to meaningfully engage with such issues as globalisation; power; innovation and invention; slavery and captivity; class, ethnic, and gender identities; social relations of technology and labour; and the spread of western capitalism. The essays in this book are adapted from papers presented at the 24th Annual Conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, held at the University of Manchester, in December 2002. The collection will be of interest to historical and urban archaeologists, architectural historians, preservation agencies, archaeological consulting organizations, and cultural resource managers.

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